AIGPG Stamps

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Throughout the site, particularly on the History Of Game AI section, you will see "stamps" of varying sorts. These are meant to express different functions depending on the type. Here is a brief explanation of the stamps you will find and what they mean:

Contents

First-Hand Knowledge

This section is based on
first-hand knowledge
by AIGPG member,
AI Person.
What does this mean?

The "author stamp" is meant to show that the author of the wiki entry either was the writer of the section it is attached to, or has verified the accuracy of that section. It doesn't necessarily mean that the information is complete and that there is no more to be told, only that the information that is there is accurate based on first-hand knowledge by the author.

Needs Input

This section
needs input
from an AIGPG member.
What does this mean?

In somewhat the reverse of the "author" stamp, the "needs input" stamp is a mark signifying that the section needs to be filled out more. While we would prefer input from someone with first-hand knowledge of the system, that is not always practical. We would certainly settle for information from other AI programmers that may be able to provide insight on the topic.

Needs Verification

This section
needs verification
by an AIGPG member.
What does this mean?

In a related sense to "needs input", a section with the "needs verification" stamp contains information that may have been created by an AIGPG member (or members) who did not necessarily have first-hand knowledge of the system. It is our hope that any "verification" tags would quickly be changed to "author" stamps once the actual designer/programmer of the system is able to verify the information.

NDA

Details on this topic are
currently under NDA.
Wish we could say more!
What does this mean?

While the AIGPG would love to be able to provide the public with information about the inner workings of all of game AI, with the nature of the game business, that is sometimes not feasible or legally allowable. Many game programmers are under non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) about the work that they perform for their employers. The AIGPG respects these contracts and will not serve to knowingly undermine them. (Note that responsibility for complying with the NDAs is that of the employee and the company, not that of the AIGPG.)

Occasionally, employees receive permission to release details specific details, however. Additionally, some NDAs expire over time. If that occurs, the NDA tag may be removed and the information filled in.

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